🐾 David's new publication on how climbing animals control adhesion 🐾

🐾 David’s new publication on how climbing animals control adhesion 🐾

OyenLab postdoc David Labonte and Walter Federle from the Cambridge University Zoology department have published a new paper; Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength. They report that control of adhesion is not solely achieved…

Yassen reaches the SB3C conference PhD student competition final

Yassen reaches the SB3C conference PhD student competition final

Congratulations to Yassen who had a podium presentation at the 2016 SB3C conference in Washington DC. He was a finalist at the very competitive PhD student competition. The conference is one of the largest meetings of bioengineers from academia, industry…

Romina has published further work on placental modelling

Romina has published further work on placental modelling

Placental transport is the main factor affecting the health and development of the fetus. Due to the placenta’s geometrical and mathematical complexity, the structure-function relations of placental terminal villi have not been successfully modeled. Hence, a novel modeling approach is…

David's much discussed article on the importance of scaling for animal adhesion

David’s much discussed article on the importance of scaling for animal adhesion

The press release on OyenLab member David Labonte’s recent article bodes ill for Marvel comic lovers. “Our study emphasises the importance of scaling for animal adhesion, and scaling is also essential for improving the performance of adhesives over much larger areas….

Romina recently published a paper on methods widely used to assess the risk of complications during pregnancy

Romina recently published a paper on methods widely used to assess the risk of complications during pregnancy

Romina’s recently published paper in Placenta, ‘The relationship between human placental morphometry and ultrasonic measurements of utero-placental blood flow and fetal growth’ can be found here.  

David's recent article on the function of the fluid found on insects’ feet

David’s recent article on the function of the fluid found on insects’ feet

How the stick insect sticks (and unsticks) itself. New research shows the fluid found on insects’ feet does not help them adhere to vertical and inverted surfaces, as previously thought, but may in fact help them to unstick their feet…

Congratulations Khaow!

Congratulations Khaow!

Congratulations to Khaow on the successful  defence of his thesis on Corneal Tissue Engineering. We would all like to like to take this opportunity to wish him all the best for the future!